Swimming in the Monsoon Sea

I’ve been excited to read this one for awhile now. I stumbled across Shyam Selvadurai a couple of years back, when I began my active search for Sri Lankan authors.

1443203Fourteen year-old Amrith is caught between childhood and adulthood. School has let out, and the holidays stretch out ahead of him in a seemingly infinite number of blank days. Amrith fears boredom, which is only kept at bay by his school’s holiday production of Othello.

Amrith, whose parents have both passed away, has effectively been adopted by Aunty Bundle, his mother’s childhood friend. He lives with her husband, and their two daughters. Lately, however, resentment has been bubbling up inside Amrith, spurred by the idea that he is alone, an orphan who has lost his real family. Which is why when Amrith’s cousin Niresh comes to visit Amrith is especially excited. It finally means a connection to his mother’s family. To Amrith’s surprise, however, he starts developing feelings for his cousin.

This is a coming of age story that tackles many themes: belonging, identity, sexuality, bravery. I couldn’t help but feel sorry for Amrith as he tried to navigate his worries of being abandoned, and having no one. His youth makes him a little rash, and he says and does many impulsive things. All the same, he is still a sympathetic character, and I couldn’t help rooting for him.

One of the cons of this novel is that it chooses to “tell” rather than “show”. The setting of Sri Lanka is beautifully described, and is quite emotive at times. However, when it comes to interactions between characters, and their inner emotional development, the narration felt slightly stilted. It took the wind out of my sails a little, considering how excited I’d been about diving into this one. I think this also added, or rather, took away from significant character development. It could certainly have been expanded on more. As it is, I’d expect this book to be intended for the younger half of the young adult spectrum.

The blurb also states that the play Othello is a backdrop that parallels Amrith’s own romantic adventure. While it, and theatre, certainly plays a significant part in Amrith’s life, it is not really dwelled on as much as the blurb would suggest.

However, as a coming of age novel, it certainly holds it own. Things are tidied up perhaps a bit too prettily at the end, but it also means leaving this young boy, that I’d grown quite fond of, in a more optimistic and stable position. As a novel that focuses on queerness and youth, I believe it’s a significant player in the field of Sri Lanakn young adult fiction.